The conservative majority on the Supreme Court could not prevail — a major defeat for all opponents of same-sex marriage in the United States. But the judges did leave them one hope.

For the last several years in the U.S., there have been many indications that the rejection of same-sex marriage could no longer be upheld. From survey to survey, more and more Americans confirmed that they would no longer object to the marriage of two men or two women. Thus, more and more states are permitting same-sex marriage; so far, there are twelve and counting. In this regard, the decision of the Supreme Court in Washington is no surprise.

On the other hand, it is, because the conservative majority on the Supreme Court could not prevail — a major defeat for all opponents of same-sex marriage. The judges did what good judges must do: They decided according to the Constitution, not according to moral considerations. And it has once more been expressly confirmed that according to the U.S. Constitution, all people are equal. Period.

The judges did leave one hope for opponents of same-sex marriage: They did not rule that same-sex marriage should be introduced in those states where it is banned today. These states can take their time. But the ruling will increase the pressure, in Mississippi and elsewhere in the country, to annul those laws that contradict the Constitution. The process may drag on for years, but it can no longer be stopped.