Car bombings and attacks by insurgents have shaken the faith of Iraqis in the new Baghdad security plan, which was unveiled today by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

The plan – which divides Baghdad into 10 security zones – has crippled the Iraqi capital with traffic congestion and no-go areas making it almost impossible for many government employees and workers to reach their destinations.

The closure of certain roads and restrictions on traffic might make it difficult for car bombers and rebels to move and mount attacks, but in Baghdad it's no easy task to identify the rebels and car bombers who have terrified the population.

They wear no special uniform and hide their guns in the presence of U.S. and Iraqi troops.

Iraqis are afraid to report them, as past experience shows that insurgents treat informers without mercy.

This is the third major operation to pacify Baghdad - most of which is under the control of either militias or insurgents.

The scale of the casualties from recent car bombings has been horrific, and it will take a long time for the people of Baghdad to recover from their impact, and it will take a long time for the people of Baghdad to recover from their impact.

With U.S. and Iraqi troops redeployed in Baghdad, insurgents have the option of increasing their attacks and violence in other areas, particularly already restive towns in central and northern Iraq.

The government says it now has over 80,000 U.S. and Iraqi troops in the city and has vowed to put an end to violence and restore security. But the prospect of them bringing some semblance of normalcy to Baghdad is a far-fetched dream.

The insurgents are reported to have reorganized their ranks to absorb the onslaught and even hit back.

Initially, they are said to avoid direct and face-to-face encounters with the troops and are set to resume their attacks once traffic is restored and street closures and blockades of residential quarters are removed.